General Science

Overview

A minor in General Science will accommodate students who desire to pursue an education incorporating several areas of science. Students will take courses from multiple disciplines: biology, chemistry, geology, physics, and psychology. Exposure to a wide range of sciences will provide students with the opportunity to pursue multiple career paths.

Courses

Below is a list of courses that are required to earn a minor in General Science. Take a look at the list below to help give you an idea of classes within this program. Be sure to review the official requirements in the Academic Catalog.

Note: This list is intended to give you a glimpse into the program’s academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising.

Required Courses

Choose one of the following: 

BIO 100 Survey of Biology    Credit Hours: 4
This course is an introduction to the major concepts in biology: What is life? Studies include the importance of cells, DNA, genes, biodiversity, and the roles of organisms in ecosystems. This is a general education course for non-science majors.

BIO 101 General Biology I and Lab     Credit Hours: 4
The first part of this class is a lecture course that covers an introduction to the general concepts that form our current understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of life. Emphasis will be given to chemical concepts and to structure and function of the cell, its metabolism, its DNA and chromosome structure, and of the mechanism of heredity, basic recombinant DNA technology, gene regulation, molecular genetics, transcription, and translation. The second part of this class is a laboratory course, with emphasis placed on basic biological chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism, energy transformation, genetics, and microscope techniques.
Note: Students failing to earn course credit for the lecture must retake that course in the next semester or term for which the student registers until course credit is earned. 

BIO 102 General Biology II and Lab     Credit Hours: 4
The first part of this class is a lecture course that covers the diversity of life, plant and animal form and structure, animal systems, and ecology. The second part of this class is a laboratory course with emphasis placed on organisms, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and microscope observations and dissections. This course is a requirement for all biology majors.
Prerequisite: BIO 101L, or instructor approval
Note: Students failing to earn course credit for the lecture must retake that course in the next semester or term for which the student registers until course credit is earned.

BIO 150 Environmental Science    Credit Hours: 4
This course is a presentation of the diverse issues related to the environment. Mechanisms of ecosystems, food production, natural resources, air and water quality, waste disposal and management, and other topics are discussed. The social, political, and economic aspects of man’s interaction with the natural environment are considered. This course may be taken as a Core Curriculum lab science.

BIO 230 Medical Terminology    Credit Hours: 3
This course is an introduction to biomedical terminology through the study of prefixes, suffixes, and root words.

CHM 105 Introductory Chemistry I    Credit Hours: 4 
This course is a study of the fundamental laws and theories of general inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, principles of chemical bonding, solutions, acids and bases, and gas laws.

CHM 106 Introductory Chemistry II     Credit Hours: 4
This course is an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. This course is designed primarily for the allied health student.
Prerequisite: CHM 111 or CHM 105

CHM 111 General Chemistry I    Credit Hours: 4
This course includes the fundamental principles and qualitative aspects of general inorganic chemistry. Topics discussed include the study of chemical stoichiometry, atomic theory, chemical bonding, and kinetic molecular theory.

CHM 112 General Chemistry II    Credit Hours: 4 
This course is a continuation of CHM 111. This course includes the study of solution chemistry, kinetics, oxidation-reductions, equilibria, and acids and bases.
Prerequisite: CHM 111

Choose one of the following:

GEOL 101 Physical Geology    Credit Hours: 4
This course is a study of the origin, development, composition, and structure of planet Earth and of the processes modifying its interior and exterior. Field trips may be included in this course.
Co-requisite: 3 hours of college-level math

GEOL 102 Historical Geology    Credit Hours: 4
This course is a study of the geological history of the planet Earth. The geologic time scale, the fossil record, and methods of interpretation are considered. Field trips may be included in this course.
Co-requisite: 3 hours of college-level math

GEOL 201 Oceanography    Credit Hours: 4
This course is an introduction to the study of the origin and history of ocean basins and the chemical, physical, and geologic processes which occur therein. There is a required field trip during Spring Break or summer.
Prerequisite: GEOL 102 or BIO 102

PHY/SCI 101 Introduction to the Physical Sciences    Credit Hours: 4
This course is a survey, by lecture/discussion, of topics in Chemistry and Physics.

PHY/SCI 102 Earth Science    Credit Hours: 3
This course is an exploration, by lecture/discussion/experimentation, of the major concepts of Astronomy, Geology, and Meteorology. Wherever possible the material will be applied to Georgia.

PHY/SCI 111 Astronomy     Credit Hours: 4
This course is a study of the structure and organization of the universe, including a consideration of the motions of its components, stellar evolution, and the instrumentation used by astronomers. Some labs will meet at night.
Prerequisite: MTH 102 or higher

PHY/SCI 121 Meteorology     Credit Hours: 4 
This course is an introduction to the study of the atmosphere, weather, and climate. Environmental concerns such as acid rain, climatic effects of carbon dioxide level, and stratospheric ozone shield will be discussed.
Prerequisite: MTH 102 or higher

PHY 201 General Physics I    Credit Hours: 4 
This course is a study of the principles of physics with an emphasis on mechanics, heat, and waves.
Prerequisite: MTH 111

PHY 221 General Physics I with calculus    Credit Hours: 4
This course is a study of the principles of physics with an emphasis on mechanics, heat, and waves. Calculus is required in this course.
Prerequisite: MTH 204

PHY 203 General Physics II    Credit Hours: 4
This course is a study of electricity, magnetism, and light.
Prerequisite: PHY 201

PHY 223 General Physics II with calculus     Credit Hours: 4
This course is a study of electricity, magnetism, and light. Calculus is required in this course.
Prerequisite: PHY 221

Choose one of the following:

BIO 202 Human Anatomy and Physiology I    Credit Hours: 4
This course is an introduction to biological processes and terminology, followed by an integrated study of the structure and function of the human body including tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and somatic nervous systems.
Prerequisite: BIO 101

BIO 203 Human Anatomy and Physiology II    Credit Hours: 4 
This course is a continuation of the study of the anatomy and physiology of the organs and systems of the human body including autonomic nervous, endocrine, circulatory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, and respiratory systems.
Prerequisite: BIO 202 or instructor approval

PSY 202 Human Growth and Development    Credit Hours: 3
This course is a comprehensive coverage of the growth and development of the human organism from conception to death.
Prerequisite: PSY 201

Choose 3 of the following:

PSY 406 Biopsychology    Credit Hours: 3
This course is a study of the biological basis of behavior and thought. After an examination of the human nervous system and how neurons communicate, this course examines the effects of various psychoactive drugs on the nervous system and the biological basis for anxiety neurosis, schizophrenia, depression, pleasure and pain, drug addiction, sexuality, stress responses, temperature regulation, thirst, and hunger.
Prerequisite: PSY 201 or 4 hours in BIO or CHM or instructor approval

HEA 330 Contemporary Health Issues    Credit Hours: 3 
This course is designed to provide prospective teacher candidates and other professionals with background knowledge and teaching strategies related to mental health and stress, aging, nutrition drugs, sexuality, death and dying, diseases, selection of medical service and health insurance, the environment, and consumer health. Substance abuse, teenage pregnancy, AIDS, teenage suicide, and other issues pertinent to professionals will be addressed.
Prerequisite: Junior Standing. EDU 201 for Education Majors

BIO 425 Topics in Biology    Credit Hours: 3-4
This course is a study of selected topics in biology. The topic will vary from year to year. Laboratory work and/or field trips may be required.
Prerequisite: Completion of at least one required BIO course or elective at 200 level.

MTH 301 Foundations of Geometry    Credit Hours: 3
This course is a study of measurement, plane and space figures, and other geometric concepts.
Prerequisite: MTH 102

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